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Placers Presents: Three Strategies For Preparing For a Job Interview

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Is there an important job interview coming up? Whether you’re looking at a temporary staffing position or something more permanent, you’ll want to make a good impression. Doing some prep work can dramatically boost your chances during this stage of the job hunt. Here are three strategies:

1: Do Your Homework

You’ve got an opportunity here to get an edge over the competition by doing your homework about the company, the position you’re shooting for, and the interview process itself. Try:

  • Researching the company. This can include who founded it and when what markets it operates in, and what products or services it offers.
  • Learning the ins and outs of the position. However, remember that a job interview is a two-way flow of information. If you aren’t clear about something, don’t be afraid to ask questions.
  • Planning answers to common interview questions. These could include questions about what challenges you have overcome in similar jobs, why you left your last position or inquiries about gaps in your job history.

Note: Don’t over prepare! This may sound a little contradictory, but over preparing and memorizing speeches or pat answers can hold you back. If your answers sound ‘canned,’ they come across as less sincere even if you’re being 100% honest. Memorizing what to say can also trip you up if they ask a slightly different question than you’d expected. Your prepared answer won’t totally fit anymore. It’s better to stick to core facts and tailor what you say as needed.

 

2: Do the Legwork

Physically prepare for your interview so the big day goes off smoothly. First, think about having a freshly updated copy of your resume on hand. If you’re taking a car there or carrying a briefcase, pack a change of clothes. After all, coffee always seems to get spilled at the worst possible time. Finally, plan how to get there and how long it should take you. When in doubt, aim to arrive a little early. This way a traffic accident along the route won’t sink your interview.

3: Center Yourself

If you’re really nervous, it will come across during the interview and can lead you to make silly mistakes. Frankly, nerves can undo all of your hard prep work, so it’s important to walk into that interview feeling calm and focused. Some popular strategies include:

  • Getting a good night’s sleep. Exhaustion can really trip you up!
  • Meditating before the interview. Even five minutes of meditation can help settle your mind.
  • Drinking hot beverages. Hot chocolate or green tea can soothe you from the inside out. Just go easy on the caffeine.
  • A morning pep talk. It may sound cheesy, but saying out loud things like ‘You’ve got this’ and ‘Everything’s going to be fine’ helps many people get into a good mindset.

A Staffing Agency On Your Side

Acing your interview is important, but before you can do that you’ll need to land one in the first place. An employment agency like Placers can help you find a great fit in Delaware’s dynamic and competitive job market. Give us a call at 302-709-0973 or visit our website to see which opportunities, from temp jobs to other positions, are available right now.

Placers Presents: Are Cover Letters Necessary in 2019?

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Cover letters have been a job seeker’s staple for decades, but are they still necessary in the digital age? While it’s true a prospective employer can view your LinkedIn page and read your resume to learn about your skills and experience, a cover letter may actually help get you an interview. According to a 2017 study by Job Seeker Nation, nearly 26 percent of recruiters read cover letters and consider them an important part of their hiring decision.

When to Include a Cover Letter

A cover letter is always required if the job posting asks for one. Additionally, if you are applying to a job and you know the person’s name, it’s a great idea to personalize your cover letter. If someone has referred you for the job, make sure to send a cover letter, mentioning that detail. And any time you are applying for a job via an email address, rather than an online form, make sure to include a cover letter (the body of your email will suffice as a cover letter, no need to attach another).

 

And if you are changing careers or have employment gaps, a cover letter is the perfect way to explain this. Potential employers have no way of knowing these things by simply looking at your resume.

Who Reads Your Cover Letter?

Generally, recruiters are the first recipients of your cover letters. They may or may not read them, but in many cases, they will forward your resume and cover letter on to the hiring manager or the potential employer. In small companies, employers tend to read all cover letters, as this is a great way for them to get to know the applicants.

When a posting receives hundreds of responses, some hiring managers may reject long resumes or those without cover letters, helping them narrow down the applicant pool.

Should You Write a Cover Letter?

Less than half of all job seekers write cover letters.  This means you will stand out from the crowd if you include a cover letter whenever possible. A cover letter lets hiring managers and recruiters know you are serious about the job, and it allows you to share more about yourself, humanizing you more than your resume ever could.

And again, if you are changing careers or have employment gaps on your resume, a cover letter can help you explain these things.

Cover Letter Tips

 

Your cover letter should be succinct, but not too short. Shoot for about least three paragraphs. Anything longer, a hiring manager may not read.

 

Your cover letter should show your interest in the position. Make sure to do your research and explain why you want to work for the company, and what drew you to the role. Highlight any past experiences which relate to the position. Focus on what value you can add to the company. Speak about what can you do for them, rather than what can they do for you.

A cover letter shows how well you can communicate. It will demonstrate your written skills, so make sure it is grammatically correct, clear, and concise.

So yes, a cover letter is still relevant in today’s digital age of hiring. Make sure you submit one every time you can and make sure it speaks to the position you are applying for, rather than sending out a cookie cutter letter each time. Personalize your cover letter to let the hiring manager know you have done your research.

Placers Presents: Are Cover Letters Necessary in 2019?

  by    0   0

Cover letters have been a job seeker’s staple for decades, but are they still necessary in the digital age? While it’s true a prospective employer can view your LinkedIn page and read your resume to learn about your skills and experience, a cover letter may actually help get you an interview. According to a 2017 study by Job Seeker Nation, nearly 26 percent of recruiters read cover letters and consider them an important part of their hiring decision.

When to Include a Cover Letter

A cover letter is always required if the job posting asks for one. Additionally, if you are applying to a job and you know the person’s name, it’s a great idea to personalize your cover letter. If someone has referred you for the job, make sure to send a cover letter, mentioning that detail. And any time you are applying for a job via an email address, rather than an online form, make sure to include a cover letter (the body of your email will suffice as a cover letter, no need to attach another).

 

And if you are changing careers or have employment gaps, a cover letter is the perfect way to explain this. Potential employers have no way of knowing these things by simply looking at your resume.

Who Reads Your Cover Letter?

Generally, recruiters are the first recipients of your cover letters. They may or may not read them, but in many cases, they will forward your resume and cover letter on to the hiring manager or the potential employer. In small companies, employers tend to read all cover letters, as this is a great way for them to get to know the applicants.

When a posting receives hundreds of responses, some hiring managers may reject long resumes or those without cover letters, helping them narrow down the applicant pool.

Should You Write a Cover Letter?

Less than half of all job seekers write cover letters.  This means you will stand out from the crowd if you include a cover letter whenever possible. A cover letter lets hiring managers and recruiters know you are serious about the job, and it allows you to share more about yourself, humanizing you more than your resume ever could.

And again, if you are changing careers or have employment gaps on your resume, a cover letter can help you explain these things.

Cover Letter Tips

 

Your cover letter should be succinct, but not too short. Shoot for about least three paragraphs. Anything longer, a hiring manager may not read.

 

Your cover letter should show your interest in the position. Make sure to do your research and explain why you want to work for the company, and what drew you to the role. Highlight any past experiences which relate to the position. Focus on what value you can add to the company. Speak about what can you do for them, rather than what can they do for you.

A cover letter shows how well you can communicate. It will demonstrate your written skills, so make sure it is grammatically correct, clear, and concise.

So yes, a cover letter is still relevant in today’s digital age of hiring. Make sure you submit one every time you can and make sure it speaks to the position you are applying for, rather than sending out a cookie cutter letter each time. Personalize your cover letter to let the hiring manager know you have done your research.

Placers Presents: Are Cover Letters Necessary in 2019?

  by    0   0

Cover letters have been a job seeker’s staple for decades, but are they still necessary in the digital age? While it’s true a prospective employer can view your LinkedIn page and read your resume to learn about your skills and experience, a cover letter may actually help get you an interview. According to a 2017 study by Job Seeker Nation, nearly 26 percent of recruiters read cover letters and consider them an important part of their hiring decision.

When to Include a Cover Letter

A cover letter is always required if the job posting asks for one. Additionally, if you are applying to a job and you know the person’s name, it’s a great idea to personalize your cover letter. If someone has referred you for the job, make sure to send a cover letter, mentioning that detail. And any time you are applying for a job via an email address, rather than an online form, make sure to include a cover letter (the body of your email will suffice as a cover letter, no need to attach another).

 

And if you are changing careers or have employment gaps, a cover letter is the perfect way to explain this. Potential employers have no way of knowing these things by simply looking at your resume.

Who Reads Your Cover Letter?

Generally, recruiters are the first recipients of your cover letters. They may or may not read them, but in many cases, they will forward your resume and cover letter on to the hiring manager or the potential employer. In small companies, employers tend to read all cover letters, as this is a great way for them to get to know the applicants.

When a posting receives hundreds of responses, some hiring managers may reject long resumes or those without cover letters, helping them narrow down the applicant pool.

Should You Write a Cover Letter?

Less than half of all job seekers write cover letters.  This means you will stand out from the crowd if you include a cover letter whenever possible. A cover letter lets hiring managers and recruiters know you are serious about the job, and it allows you to share more about yourself, humanizing you more than your resume ever could.

And again, if you are changing careers or have employment gaps on your resume, a cover letter can help you explain these things.

Cover Letter Tips

 

Your cover letter should be succinct, but not too short. Shoot for about least three paragraphs. Anything longer, a hiring manager may not read.

 

Your cover letter should show your interest in the position. Make sure to do your research and explain why you want to work for the company, and what drew you to the role. Highlight any past experiences which relate to the position. Focus on what value you can add to the company. Speak about what can you do for them, rather than what can they do for you.

A cover letter shows how well you can communicate. It will demonstrate your written skills, so make sure it is grammatically correct, clear, and concise.

So yes, a cover letter is still relevant in today’s digital age of hiring. Make sure you submit one every time you can and make sure it speaks to the position you are applying for, rather than sending out a cookie cutter letter each time. Personalize your cover letter to let the hiring manager know you have done your research.

Placers Presents: Are Cover Letters Necessary in 2019?

  by    0   0

Cover letters have been a job seeker’s staple for decades, but are they still necessary in the digital age? While it’s true a prospective employer can view your LinkedIn page and read your resume to learn about your skills and experience, a cover letter may actually help get you an interview. According to a 2017 study by Job Seeker Nation, nearly 26 percent of recruiters read cover letters and consider them an important part of their hiring decision.

When to Include a Cover Letter

A cover letter is always required if the job posting asks for one. Additionally, if you are applying to a job and you know the person’s name, it’s a great idea to personalize your cover letter. If someone has referred you for the job, make sure to send a cover letter, mentioning that detail. And any time you are applying for a job via an email address, rather than an online form, make sure to include a cover letter (the body of your email will suffice as a cover letter, no need to attach another).

 

And if you are changing careers or have employment gaps, a cover letter is the perfect way to explain this. Potential employers have no way of knowing these things by simply looking at your resume.

Who Reads Your Cover Letter?

Generally, recruiters are the first recipients of your cover letters. They may or may not read them, but in many cases, they will forward your resume and cover letter on to the hiring manager or the potential employer. In small companies, employers tend to read all cover letters, as this is a great way for them to get to know the applicants.

When a posting receives hundreds of responses, some hiring managers may reject long resumes or those without cover letters, helping them narrow down the applicant pool.

Should You Write a Cover Letter?

Less than half of all job seekers write cover letters.  This means you will stand out from the crowd if you include a cover letter whenever possible. A cover letter lets hiring managers and recruiters know you are serious about the job, and it allows you to share more about yourself, humanizing you more than your resume ever could.

And again, if you are changing careers or have employment gaps on your resume, a cover letter can help you explain these things.

Cover Letter Tips

 

Your cover letter should be succinct, but not too short. Shoot for about least three paragraphs. Anything longer, a hiring manager may not read.

 

Your cover letter should show your interest in the position. Make sure to do your research and explain why you want to work for the company, and what drew you to the role. Highlight any past experiences which relate to the position. Focus on what value you can add to the company. Speak about what can you do for them, rather than what can they do for you.

A cover letter shows how well you can communicate. It will demonstrate your written skills, so make sure it is grammatically correct, clear, and concise.

So yes, a cover letter is still relevant in today’s digital age of hiring. Make sure you submit one every time you can and make sure it speaks to the position you are applying for, rather than sending out a cookie cutter letter each time. Personalize your cover letter to let the hiring manager know you have done your research.

Placers Presents: Five Tips for Searching for Remote Work

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When combined with raising children as a stay-at-home mom or dad, finding a traditional full-time job outside the home may not be the optimal solution. Many parents with young children at home are often faced with the challenge of not being able to work full-time hours, but still want and need to remain in the workforce as an active contributor. Here are five tips to consider when searching for remote work.

TAKE AN HONEST ASSESSMENT

Before beginning your job search journey, it’s important to take an honest assessment of the following:

  • How many hours and days are you willing to work?
  • Are you willing to change your daily routine to accommodate working from home?
  • Will you require benefits such as healthcare or paid time off?
  • Are you willing to be responsible for your own taxes if you secured a contract (1099) job?
  • Are you seeking a long-term employee (W2) position or a temporary short-term position?

By responding to these questions, your job search will be hyper-focused and more effective. Parents of young children can often be subjected to the pressures of finding life/work balance. Therefore, starting your job search with a laser-focused approach will be most effective.

UNDERSTAND THE JARGON

While working from home can conjure up thoughts of working in your pajamas, many people may fail to realize that working from home is in fact — work. It’s important to understand the different search terms used today that may describe an element of telecommuting to help your job search:

  • Remote/Virtual — this popular ‘umbrella’ term is commonly used to describe work that can be done from a specified location outside a traditional workplace environment.
  • Work from home — employers may require contractors or temporary workers to be available for specific hours as well as having a professional home office set up that includes a PC or laptop, high-speed internet access or a webcam.

GET ORGANIZED

Stay at home moms and dads understand the importance of being organized when dealing with raising young children and their daily demands. Adding a job search to the mix doesn’t have to create additional chaos. Take advantage of online calendars such as ICAL. Create a spreadsheet in Google sheets or MS Excel to keep track of jobs you have applied for, capture company URLs, and interview dates.

FOLLOW DIRECTIONS

When applying for work from home jobs, it’s important to read and understand the entire job description and follow all directions. For instance, if the job application requires attaching a resume and cover letter, attaching these items as requested will not only demonstrate that you can follow directions but will increase your chances of being noticed by a prospective employer.

 

USE SOCIAL MEDIA TO YOUR ADVANTAGE

Because many stay at home parents actively use social media to post cute pictures of their kids and capture special events, they may already be familiar with using social media. Be sure to access telecommute and work from home groups to network and discover companies that are currently seeking to hire remote workers.

Searching for remote work doesn’t have to be a complicated endeavor. By remaining vigilant and focused in your job search and using these tips, you can increase your chances of securing your work at home dream job that will give you the work-life balance you’ve always wanted.