Blogs

Top 10 Career Transition Questions: #3 Is being on LinkedIn an imperative?

  by    0   0

Blog post by Career Transition Coach, Mary Schaefer

This blog is part of a series addressing some of the most compelling questions for those that are beginning a career search. During the last 6 years, we have been asked hundreds of questions related to career transition and best practices. Here we are distilling those queries down to the 10 most critical need to know responses. Here is #3 of 10, discussing the virtual networking and using social media in your career search.

How strong is my social media presence on virtual networking groups like LinkedIn and do I have a plan for how to use these tools to support my search?

It’s a new world for some of us when it comes to having an online presence. There is boundless content out there to help guide you to create a strong LinkedIn profile, for instance. Why do you need this at all? If you are a job seeker, 77% of all job openings are posted on LinkedIn and 48% of recruiters post jobs solely on LinkedIn, according to information gathered by Masters-in-Human-Resources.org.

Career-Transition-Linkedin

 
For those in career management mode, you can use LinkedIn as a more formal means to compile your accomplishments, training and certifications. No matter whether you are transitioning in your career or managing it, LinkedIn is essential to gather contacts, including those you know, and those for which you could have a mutually beneficial acquaintanceship.

There are many social media outlets. According to social branding consultant, William Arruda, LinkedIn is quickly becoming a hub of professional communications, and it’s the accepted social media resource for serious business. When potential employers, prospective clients or new business collaborators go to look for you you want to be on LinkedIn with a robust presence.

Outside-In® Companies Partner with Medical Society of Delaware

  by    0   0

This summer, Outside-In® Companies Placers, CBI Group and Barton Career Advisors became a new Affinity Partner to the Medical Society of Delaware. The Medical Society’s Physician Relations team assists practices with all aspects of practice management support. With physicians’ offices and hospital organizations growing at such a rapid pace and rising competition for the best people, MSD saw a partnership with Outside-In® as a great opportunity to serve their members’ medical staffing needs. Outside-In® Companies will assist MSD members with recruitment, staffing and outplacement services.

“The Medical Society of Delaware is thrilled to partner with an organization of Outside-In® Companies’ reputation and stature. The Outside-In® team has a strong record in health care staffing in the area and are known for providing their clients – and our members – top-notch service. This is yet another example of the quality programs, products and services available to the Delaware physicians through their state medical association,” said Mark Meister, MSD’s Executive Director.

Outside-In® Companies Founder and President, Chris Burkhard comments, “We have been helping Delaware’s medical community for more than 40 years since the founding of The Placers. We are excited to bring all our expertise to bear formally as we provide cost effective talent solutions to the association.”

For a full listing of the Medical Society of Delaware’s Affinity partners, please click here.

Do your recruiters use the “Recruitment Bulldozer” method?

  by    0   0

Outside-In® Chronicles: Originally published with the title Look out for the Recruitment Bulldozer! four years ago this month. Are you a recruiter that bulldozes candidates? Is your company running over candidates to fill jobs? Here’s a suggestion for a more Outside-In® way to recruit. But first, let’s explain what we mean by bulldozing!

Over the years, I have coached many talent acquisition professionals. One of the soundbites that I’m typically heard saying is, “don’t bulldoze!” What do I mean? Recruiters are tasked with presenting our company, knowing what the hiring manager is looking for and understanding technical terms to have knowledgeable discussions with prospects. Once we are prepped for an interview, we get so excited to share what we know, that we tend to pitch the job. This usually sounds something like, “Hi John, I am Chris Burkhard from CBI Group and I am recruiting today for underwater basket weavers.”

The challenge with the job pitch approach is that it doesn’t leave a good next step. If the person is not interested or does not have the right skills, we need to quickly transition to asking for referrals or help with networking. The problem is that with this approach, the majority of recruiters never talk to that person again. We keep plowing ahead for the talent we need for the requisition in front of us. We just keep running callers over to find what we want.Bulldozer Front RetroAfter I say, “Don’t bulldoze” and I have the recruiter’s attention, I suggest a more Outside-In® way to recruit. I certainly did not invent this approach but I have refined it over the years to be more customer centered.

How? Flip the conversation around and focus your conversation on the caller. Find out what matters to the job seeker. What are they trying to accomplish in their career? Focusing on them typically sounds a little different. “John, I help talented underwater basket weavers achieve their next career objective. Could we spend a little time finding out about you and what you might be interested in?” This approach requires a lot of time, energy and curiosity. But isn’t finding out what the person wants helpful to determine if your current opening is a fit right? If not for this req, then perhaps you can be honest and talk in bigger terms — about where your company is going and how the future might involve them.

The focus shifts to building a relationship with the talent. To building potential pipeline. This makes tomorrows’ recruitment easier and this is where good recruiting takes shape. It means you truly know your talent in the marketplace and particular people come to mind when open requisitions fit their career goals and objectives.

It may seem so much easier to take the Bulldozer path. I hear it over and over again, “I do not have the time and I have jobs to fill.” But I think the typical recruiter has it all wrong. None of us should have the time to do it wrong the first time. Recruiting talent and getting to know prospective candidates is what recruiters should and must do to differentiate. No more bulldozing please!
 

Top 10 Career Transition Questions: #2 How do I best represent my professional brand with a resume?

  by    0   0

Blog post by Barton Career Advisors Founder and Managing Partner Chris Barton

This blog is part of a series addressing some of the most compelling questions for those that are beginning a career search. During the last 6 years, we have been asked hundreds of questions related to career transition and best practices. Here we are distilling those queries down to the 10 most critical need to know responses. Here is #2 of 10, discussing the ever-important professional resume document.

#2 Do my resume and search materials reflect the most current trends in professional branding and have I adequately conveyed transferable skills that can be leveraged in other industries or roles?

This is an incredibly important matter when it comes time to start marketing yourself for a new opportunity or when you need to craft a solution to get out of a company or role that is less than optimal. While no resume will ever be the sole solution to open doors for new gigs, it is absolutely critical that the document is a confirmation of the accomplished professional you have become. Imagine getting the opportunity to meet with an influential leader that could help you in your career path. Next, envision that you have adequately impressed that person through a phone conversation or coffee chat. The logical next step then would be that they ask you for a copy of your resume. “Hey, shoot me a copy of your resume so I can forward it to our CEO.” How are you feeling now? Getting “on stage” for opportunities is really hard, so you do not want to treat the resume as a mere formality. That document is the marketing brochure for a very important product, you.

Resumes have evolved over the last 10 years. It used to be sufficient to tell the reader three things. 1. What kind of job you want (an objective) 2. A chronological career list with job titles and 3. Provide contact details. Unfortunately that quick and dirty approach is not nearly enough anymore. You are competing with a marketplace of job seekers that have literally grown up with a personal social media brand. Not only does your resume have to speak to the quantitative nature of your contributions to your profession, it must also show a crispness in demonstrating that you really understand “you” as a resource and solution. Once you have achieved an accurate, compelling digital document, creating linkages to your online profiles will provide the finishing touches. If necessary, get the professional help you need to do it right.  While it may cost a few hundred bucks to do a resume professionally, imagine what it will cost if you get it wrong.

14 Years Young!

  by    0   0

I never thought my business would live to make it to the teenage years. When I started the business I had a 9 year plan and an 89 page business plan. After 14 years, we now operate with quarterly priorities and 1-3 year goals on one big, ever-evolving page. I have learned I cannot, and I no longer try, to control it all. Let it come. Listen to the universe and the market. Take advantage of opportunities. That is my simple mantra today. But I have many memories, both good and not-so-good, that I would like to share. This list won’t be about firsts and largest. Just great memories that stand out.

A memory for each of our 14 years in business!  

2001: I knew I would face adversity as I got started but had no idea how much! I just wish I didn’t have a flood, theft and 9/11 happen all before we officially opened for business. It was a tough start for Outside-In®!

2002: I worked often. In fact I worked every single day of this year. Folks started to recognize our business and to buy our services. I learned that working hard and working smart matter!

2003: In January of this year we trademarked Outside-In®. Other than that, I don’t even remember 2003. Did I mention that you have to work a lot to start a business from scratch?

2004: The year we got our first real office! I started the business from a coat closet that I rented from a good friend. In 2004, we moved to our new headquarters here at Casho Mill Road.

2005: CBI Group was recognized by the Philadelphia Business Journal’s Best Places to Work program, was the recipient of The News Journal’s 2005 Best In Business Award for Best Up and Coming Company, and we placed #19 on the Philadelphia 100 growth list. We knew we had “made it”.

2006: The Year of the “Weepul” — we have had different employee recognition programs over the years. This year my team would receive “Weepuls” for “getting caught being Outside-In®.” Weepuls are a small, spherical, fluffy toy, with large, plastic googly eyes and no limbs. They were everywhere in the office, most of them stuck to the top of our computer monitors.

2007: We established our first annual theme this year, a Dr. Seuss theme ‘O the Places We Will Go.’ It was a great fit for the company that year because 2007 was a year of possibilities.

2008:  The year the Great Recession begins. We had a successful first seven months of the year but by August the market was on high alert. By October customers were making cuts, decreasing hiring projections or freezing hiring altogether. This was also the year I started the Outside-In® Guy blog, perhaps the writing started as therapy for rough business times.

2009:  This is the year I learned that I could do every job in the business. Why?  Because I had to survive. It was a slow year, but good year. Nothing like a good recession to give a team a common enemy. We fought hard, grew again and made it all work.  And this is the year I stopped wearing a suit and tie to work every day!

2010: We won the NCCCC Entrepreneur of the Year award this year. The same award my father won in the 80’s. We were proud to be the only Father/Son winners!

2011: We had an office fire and flood on Superbowl Sunday. This was a challenging time as the business faced many obstacles to stay open (spoiler alert, we did) and find any kind of normalcy for a few months. We did it, and we grew stronger through it. That is when I knew a business is done only when the leaders say it is!

2012: Placers comes back strong. CBI Group made the HRO Today Baker’s Dozen List, recognized as an Honorable Mention and Mid Market Leader, among 21 companies acknowledged through customer feedback.

2013: CBI Group, Placers and Barton Career Advisors announced a new partnership under our shared values-based culture, Outside-In®. The companies now work together under the Outside-In® brand as full service talent organization for career and outplacement services serving the national marketplace.

2014:  This is the year of the bad Northeastern winter when no one could get to work. Few did much proactively with their companies. The first four months of the year were terrible for most businesses. We made the most of it and got back on track!

2015: We have grown 44% in the first half of the year and have all the nicks and dings to show for it. Growth is hard, but I continue to learn something new every day!

The 2015 Outside-In Summer Reading List

  by    0   0

Sometimes I can’t find enough time to read the pile of “must reads” on my night stand. So I am careful to suggest that others add to their guilt (I might be projecting my own guilt!) by having even more book and article suggestions to tack on to their lists.

Books.Pile of book on desk.When I make time to read, however, I am able to set aside the events of the day and the many distractions from people and electronics and something amazing starts to happen. Ideas and thoughts seem to flow in a torrent! I hope you’re able to spark your learning in a similar fashion. Find the time. It reduces stress and allows you to chew on the problems of the day in a new and productive way. And as a CEO or business leader, you don’t have to read all business books to find inspiration. This year, the trend (Fortune & LA Times for example) is for CEOs to read non business books to inspire new ideas.

So whether you’re committing to regular reading or simply looking for something to do on that family camping trip or week at the beach, this August I have a few page turners to consider.

  1. Choose Yourself by James Altucher: James is an avid writer, blogger and many time entrepreneur. Choose Yourself defines today’s workplace realities and offers real world ideas on how to take control of your work and how you will forever define how you earn an income. Thought provoking!
  2. In the Kingdom of Ice: The Grand and Terrible Polar Voyage of the USS Jeannette, by Hampton Sides: This one grips you! A few weeks ago, I spent a week ignoring friends and family on the beach in Block Island and read this one. It’s a true story researched for years by Hampton, Outside Magazine and others. This is the greatest historical story you don’t know! Great lessons in leadership, sacrifice, and survival. Imagine trying to get to the North Pole in a wooden ship with no means of communication with the outside world!
  3. Delivering Happiness A Path to Profits, Passion, and Purpose by Tony Hsieh, CEO Zappos.com. In a business world where few have any real meaningful, sustainable business advantage, Delivering Happiness chronicles the dramatic rise of Zappos and how their culture drives everything and defines their success. And it is an entertaining read to boot! Not every success is immediate and over night. Success takes time, risk and perseverance.

I am always scanning for the next must read, I hear the Uncontainable, The Story of the Container Store by Kip Tindell is a must read… Next on the list? What books are on your list? Share away!