Blogs

When to Consider Contract-to-Hire Jobs

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By Outside-In® Team Member Zach Werde

Struggling to find your next big permanent career opportunity? Below I have shared some advice for when to go for a contract-to-hire and when not to.

I’m guessing you’ve heard the good and the bad on contract-to-hires roles (I’ll refer to this as C2H below). You’ve probably heard from friends who have taken C2H positions and were later “hired” or “converted” and worked happily ever after at that company. You’ve also probably heard horror stories about people who left their permanent position for a C2H and got the short end of the stick. Or who took a job because a recruiter promised them that it was “definitely” going to convert to perm, but didn’t. If you have been on the job market for a while, or if you urgently need a new position, you may be doing yourself a disservice by not at least considering a good C2H role. You may be surprised about how many Fortune 500 companies or other companies with really good opportunities are using contract or temp-to-hire as part of their staffing model. Let’s take a look at some things to think about when contemplating whether a contract-to hire job is a good option for you… when to consider it and when to run for the hills!

When to consider contract-to-hire

When you aren’t working. What’s the worst that can happen? Even if you don’t convert, at least you’ll have some work and more importantly add value to your resume.

If it is a “true” C2H model. There is a HUGE difference between a company that uses C2H as model for hiring because they like the try-before-you-buy model and has budget and headcount approved, and between a contract position that has “the possibility of conversion”. Play close attention to the verbiage and really push (respectfully please) your recruiter or hiring manager by asking them about the model. Ask them if budget and headcount are approved or if this is a position where they start out contracting and “figure out the rest” later.

When you can establish some reliability or validity to the situation. Are you working through a recruitment agency whom you trust? Do you know someone at the organization? Can you find reviews on Glassdoor or other sites where people are confirming they took a C2H with the company and converted?

When to run for the hills

If you are working a permanent position. NEVER leave a permanent position for a C2H! I would only condone this in an extreme Win Win Win Win scenario – for example, you are expecting impending layoffs and you have a contract-to-hire opportunity that is closer to home, more money, with a better company etc.

It is not a “true” C2H model. See the second reason above. I’d still consider it if I wasn’t working, but I’d be much more hesitant.

If a recruiter or hiring manager tells you the position will definitely convert. This can never be guaranteed. They are unethical or uneducated at best. Run run run run run run run run run run run run run.

CBI Way: Engaging Your Talent Pipeline

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By Outside-In® Team Member Alex Patton

Just as important as getting your talent pipeline started is keeping that same pipeline engaged with your business. Long before a position that needs to be filled quickly opens, you should be building relationships with the talent pools you’ve created or identified. There are number of ways to engage your pipeline. The methods that will work best for your talent pipeline will probably depend on the type of candidates that are in your pool. Let’s take a look at two strategies for engaging those candidates; social media and in-person networking.

According to a survey by ERE, just 38% of employers continuously recruit throughout a year. Talent pipelining is almost exactly that; keeping in touch with quality candidates, and forming a relationship that could pay dividends in the future. Your pipeline is like your business’ network. Think about sponsoring live networking events at a local college and give young professionals an inside look into your business, its values, and its goals. If you’re recruiting healthcare workers, promote an event for healthcare workers to your healthcare talent pipeline. Set a meeting place, a speaker, and an interesting presentation on new trends in the medical field, and explain the value the information could provide. Follow up the event with an email survey to the attendees in your pipeline and ask them to rate their experience and if they would attend another similar event for medical professionals.

The combination of personal networking and social media content can go a long way in keeping your pipeline engaged. The candidates could be interested in the next event or may be looking for more relevant content about their industry or even your company. Don’t forget to use social media and web content to your advantage. It’s easily accessible, simple to send out, and is a critical tool for keeping your pipeline aware and engaged.

Have you heard about our talent pipelining service, talentSOURCE? Learn about the sourcing service and benefits by downloading the talentSOURCE PDF.

Outplacement Trends: Has Anything Changed?

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Blog post by Barton Career Advisors Founder and Managing Partner Chris Barton

It was back in 2009, right around the beginning of April that I founded Barton Career Advisors. Just a few months later, the Wall Street Journal published an article about how outplacement firms were struggling amidst the recession to provide services to displaced employees. Specifically, the piece derided the practices of one size fits all outplacement. Former employees were experiencing staggeringly low service levels from their outplacement program. Probably should not have been a surprise, right?

At Barton Career Advisors, we were wondering if anything has really changed in the last six years in our industry. The truth is, that some things have changed. But many things have remained constant. Let’s take a look of a few of the things companies are saying about buying outplacement services for their former team members:

  • Companies still are making purchasing decisions for outplacement to manage risk mitigation, reputation, and to reduce the costs of unemployment insurance.

  • The market is still wary of “technology-only” outplacement offerings.  As a matter of fact, a 2014 report published by outplacement provider RiseSmart indicated that only 3% of the companies that offer outplacement do so with a technology only product.

  • There’s still a challenge in convincing companies that outplacement should be offered to all levels of employees. The same survey showed that while 50% of executives and managers get outplacement services, only around 37% of administrative and non-exempt employees get the same consideration.

  • Nearly 1/3 of companies that are using traditional brick and mortar outplacement are dissatisfied with the performance of their providers.

The survey published by RiseSmart presents an interesting picture and is certainly a valuable contribution to our industry. We are led to conclude at Barton Career Advisors that business leaders are still skeptical about the performance of the outplacement industry and its players. We believe that the only true advantage in corporate outplacement is to build lasting relationships between an expert career transition coach and the client – each and every one of them. Every employee that is affected by career transition deserves expert, tailored outplacement services that meet their individualized needs.  At Barton Career Advisors we are dedicated to a business model characterized by productive one on one coaching relationships that are supported by innovative technologies.

Outplacement Trends: Has Anything Changed?

  by    0   0

Blog post by Barton Career Advisors Founder and Managing Partner Chris Barton

It was back in 2009, right around the beginning of April that I founded Barton Career Advisors. Just a few months later, the Wall Street Journal published an article about how outplacement firms were struggling amidst the recession to provide services to displaced employees. Specifically, the piece derided the practices of one size fits all outplacement. Former employees were experiencing staggeringly low service levels from their outplacement program. Probably should not have been a surprise, right?

At Barton Career Advisors, we were wondering if anything has really changed in the last six years in our industry. The truth is, that some things have changed. But many things have remained constant. Let’s take a look of a few of the things companies are saying about buying outplacement services for their former team members:

  • Companies still are making purchasing decisions for outplacement to manage risk mitigation, reputation, and to reduce the costs of unemployment insurance.

  • The market is still wary of “technology-only” outplacement offerings.  As a matter of fact, a 2014 report published by outplacement provider RiseSmart indicated that only 3% of the companies that offer outplacement do so with a technology only product.

  • There’s still a challenge in convincing companies that outplacement should be offered to all levels of employees. The same survey showed that while 50% of executives and managers get outplacement services, only around 37% of administrative and non-exempt employees get the same consideration.

  • Nearly 1/3 of companies that are using traditional brick and mortar outplacement are dissatisfied with the performance of their providers.

The survey published by RiseSmart presents an interesting picture and is certainly a valuable contribution to our industry. We are led to conclude at Barton Career Advisors that business leaders are still skeptical about the performance of the outplacement industry and its players. We believe that the only true advantage in corporate outplacement is to build lasting relationships between an expert career transition coach and the client – each and every one of them. Every employee that is affected by career transition deserves expert, tailored outplacement services that meet their individualized needs.  At Barton Career Advisors we are dedicated to a business model characterized by productive one on one coaching relationships that are supported by innovative technologies.

Outplacement Trends: Has Anything Changed?

  by    0   0

Blog post by Barton Career Advisors Founder and Managing Partner Chris Barton

It was back in 2009, right around the beginning of April that I founded Barton Career Advisors. Just a few months later, the Wall Street Journal published an article about how outplacement firms were struggling amidst the recession to provide services to displaced employees. Specifically, the piece derided the practices of one size fits all outplacement. Former employees were experiencing staggeringly low service levels from their outplacement program. Probably should not have been a surprise, right?

At Barton Career Advisors, we were wondering if anything has really changed in the last six years in our industry. The truth is, that some things have changed. But many things have remained constant. Let’s take a look of a few of the things companies are saying about buying outplacement services for their former team members:

  • Companies still are making purchasing decisions for outplacement to manage risk mitigation, reputation, and to reduce the costs of unemployment insurance.

  • The market is still wary of “technology-only” outplacement offerings.  As a matter of fact, a 2014 report published by outplacement provider RiseSmart indicated that only 3% of the companies that offer outplacement do so with a technology only product.

  • There’s still a challenge in convincing companies that outplacement should be offered to all levels of employees. The same survey showed that while 50% of executives and managers get outplacement services, only around 37% of administrative and non-exempt employees get the same consideration.

  • Nearly 1/3 of companies that are using traditional brick and mortar outplacement are dissatisfied with the performance of their providers.

The survey published by RiseSmart presents an interesting picture and is certainly a valuable contribution to our industry. We are led to conclude at Barton Career Advisors that business leaders are still skeptical about the performance of the outplacement industry and its players. We believe that the only true advantage in corporate outplacement is to build lasting relationships between an expert career transition coach and the client – each and every one of them. Every employee that is affected by career transition deserves expert, tailored outplacement services that meet their individualized needs.  At Barton Career Advisors we are dedicated to a business model characterized by productive one on one coaching relationships that are supported by innovative technologies.

How a Good Staffing Agency Can be a Partner and Not Just a Vendor

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By Outside-In® Team Member Zach Werde

If you don’t understand the title of my blog, then I’m going to go out on a limb and say that your staffing partners really aren’t partners at all. They are vendors. I think there’s no way to elaborate better than to break down an example of each below.

My Staffing Partner is Really a Vendor

In this scenario, your relationship with your staffing agency is all about transactions. When you have a job order, you push it out to your vendor(s). They spend some time and work on your need and send you any qualified candidates they can find. If you fill the role with one of their candidates, they send you a really large bill in return. You may find that their priority is more on quantity and less on quality. Their leading theory is that if they blast you with a lot of profiles, you’ll want to interview at least one of them.

You may spend a lot of time looking at resumes that aren’t qualified and interviewing candidates who aren’t up to par. While you are going through the hiring process, a vendor certainly will not be able to consult with you. They will not give you competitive intelligence on how other companies are hiring and where they have seen success. They will not have the experience or the courage to tell you when there is a major flaw with your hiring process, or more importantly, how to fix it. They simply live in a transactional world where it is all about “closing the deal” and have tunnel vision in trying to accomplish that goal.

My Staffing Partner is Actually a Partner

What if you encountered an agency who could, from day one, have a credible conversation because they have the experience and expertise to actually consult with you? Instead of telling you what you want to hear, they can have the conversation you’d typically be having with your vendor after having worked on your position for 4 weeks on the first day. That saves you time, which saves you money. What if you were working with a partner who actually “gets it”? Instead of blasting you with ten resumes a week, they took the time identify what it is you are really looking for and sent you only the qualified candidates. This saves you time, which saves you money.

What if you you reached out to your partner because you have been struggling to fill a need, and instead of just taking a job order, they could tell you how to fill the role? They can do this because they have done it before and can share with you the best practices that they have seen work for other organizations. What if your partner cared more about the long-term relationship and less about the short-term transaction? That means doing the right thing, and not just telling you what you want to hear because they want to close the deal. Wouldn’t it be great if you could rely on your staffing agency as a partner, and know they will work with you build a customized solution to fill your positions?

Conclusion

There are a lot of agencies out there, and choosing the right one can seem a bit daunting. Some staffing agencies are so large that you have to play by their rules. If your need isn’t a certain bill rate, or the assignment isn’t a certain duration, or you don’t have a process that conforms to theirs, they may not even allow you the privilege of working with them. This is the trademark of someone who is worried more about the transaction then the relationship. The bottom line, if you feel that the relationship you have with your staffing agency is a bit transactional and a bit one-sided, I’m here to tell you that there is hope. There are customer-centric agencies out there who pride themselves as being a consultative partner rather than a transactional vendor.