Blogs

Outplacement Trends: Has Anything Changed?

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Blog post by Barton Career Advisors Founder and Managing Partner Chris Barton

It was back in 2009, right around the beginning of April that I founded Barton Career Advisors. Just a few months later, the Wall Street Journal published an article about how outplacement firms were struggling amidst the recession to provide services to displaced employees. Specifically, the piece derided the practices of one size fits all outplacement. Former employees were experiencing staggeringly low service levels from their outplacement program. Probably should not have been a surprise, right?

At Barton Career Advisors, we were wondering if anything has really changed in the last six years in our industry. The truth is, that some things have changed. But many things have remained constant. Let’s take a look of a few of the things companies are saying about buying outplacement services for their former team members:

  • Companies still are making purchasing decisions for outplacement to manage risk mitigation, reputation, and to reduce the costs of unemployment insurance.

  • The market is still wary of “technology-only” outplacement offerings.  As a matter of fact, a 2014 report published by outplacement provider RiseSmart indicated that only 3% of the companies that offer outplacement do so with a technology only product.

  • There’s still a challenge in convincing companies that outplacement should be offered to all levels of employees. The same survey showed that while 50% of executives and managers get outplacement services, only around 37% of administrative and non-exempt employees get the same consideration.

  • Nearly 1/3 of companies that are using traditional brick and mortar outplacement are dissatisfied with the performance of their providers.

The survey published by RiseSmart presents an interesting picture and is certainly a valuable contribution to our industry. We are led to conclude at Barton Career Advisors that business leaders are still skeptical about the performance of the outplacement industry and its players. We believe that the only true advantage in corporate outplacement is to build lasting relationships between an expert career transition coach and the client – each and every one of them. Every employee that is affected by career transition deserves expert, tailored outplacement services that meet their individualized needs.  At Barton Career Advisors we are dedicated to a business model characterized by productive one on one coaching relationships that are supported by innovative technologies.

Outplacement Trends: Has Anything Changed?

  by    0   0

Blog post by Barton Career Advisors Founder and Managing Partner Chris Barton

It was back in 2009, right around the beginning of April that I founded Barton Career Advisors. Just a few months later, the Wall Street Journal published an article about how outplacement firms were struggling amidst the recession to provide services to displaced employees. Specifically, the piece derided the practices of one size fits all outplacement. Former employees were experiencing staggeringly low service levels from their outplacement program. Probably should not have been a surprise, right?

At Barton Career Advisors, we were wondering if anything has really changed in the last six years in our industry. The truth is, that some things have changed. But many things have remained constant. Let’s take a look of a few of the things companies are saying about buying outplacement services for their former team members:

  • Companies still are making purchasing decisions for outplacement to manage risk mitigation, reputation, and to reduce the costs of unemployment insurance.

  • The market is still wary of “technology-only” outplacement offerings.  As a matter of fact, a 2014 report published by outplacement provider RiseSmart indicated that only 3% of the companies that offer outplacement do so with a technology only product.

  • There’s still a challenge in convincing companies that outplacement should be offered to all levels of employees. The same survey showed that while 50% of executives and managers get outplacement services, only around 37% of administrative and non-exempt employees get the same consideration.

  • Nearly 1/3 of companies that are using traditional brick and mortar outplacement are dissatisfied with the performance of their providers.

The survey published by RiseSmart presents an interesting picture and is certainly a valuable contribution to our industry. We are led to conclude at Barton Career Advisors that business leaders are still skeptical about the performance of the outplacement industry and its players. We believe that the only true advantage in corporate outplacement is to build lasting relationships between an expert career transition coach and the client – each and every one of them. Every employee that is affected by career transition deserves expert, tailored outplacement services that meet their individualized needs.  At Barton Career Advisors we are dedicated to a business model characterized by productive one on one coaching relationships that are supported by innovative technologies.

Outplacement Trends: Has Anything Changed?

  by    0   0

Blog post by Barton Career Advisors Founder and Managing Partner Chris Barton

It was back in 2009, right around the beginning of April that I founded Barton Career Advisors. Just a few months later, the Wall Street Journal published an article about how outplacement firms were struggling amidst the recession to provide services to displaced employees. Specifically, the piece derided the practices of one size fits all outplacement. Former employees were experiencing staggeringly low service levels from their outplacement program. Probably should not have been a surprise, right?

At Barton Career Advisors, we were wondering if anything has really changed in the last six years in our industry. The truth is, that some things have changed. But many things have remained constant. Let’s take a look of a few of the things companies are saying about buying outplacement services for their former team members:

  • Companies still are making purchasing decisions for outplacement to manage risk mitigation, reputation, and to reduce the costs of unemployment insurance.

  • The market is still wary of “technology-only” outplacement offerings.  As a matter of fact, a 2014 report published by outplacement provider RiseSmart indicated that only 3% of the companies that offer outplacement do so with a technology only product.

  • There’s still a challenge in convincing companies that outplacement should be offered to all levels of employees. The same survey showed that while 50% of executives and managers get outplacement services, only around 37% of administrative and non-exempt employees get the same consideration.

  • Nearly 1/3 of companies that are using traditional brick and mortar outplacement are dissatisfied with the performance of their providers.

The survey published by RiseSmart presents an interesting picture and is certainly a valuable contribution to our industry. We are led to conclude at Barton Career Advisors that business leaders are still skeptical about the performance of the outplacement industry and its players. We believe that the only true advantage in corporate outplacement is to build lasting relationships between an expert career transition coach and the client – each and every one of them. Every employee that is affected by career transition deserves expert, tailored outplacement services that meet their individualized needs.  At Barton Career Advisors we are dedicated to a business model characterized by productive one on one coaching relationships that are supported by innovative technologies.

How a Good Staffing Agency Can be a Partner and Not Just a Vendor

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By Outside-In® Team Member Zach Werde

If you don’t understand the title of my blog, then I’m going to go out on a limb and say that your staffing partners really aren’t partners at all. They are vendors. I think there’s no way to elaborate better than to break down an example of each below.

My Staffing Partner is Really a Vendor

In this scenario, your relationship with your staffing agency is all about transactions. When you have a job order, you push it out to your vendor(s). They spend some time and work on your need and send you any qualified candidates they can find. If you fill the role with one of their candidates, they send you a really large bill in return. You may find that their priority is more on quantity and less on quality. Their leading theory is that if they blast you with a lot of profiles, you’ll want to interview at least one of them.

You may spend a lot of time looking at resumes that aren’t qualified and interviewing candidates who aren’t up to par. While you are going through the hiring process, a vendor certainly will not be able to consult with you. They will not give you competitive intelligence on how other companies are hiring and where they have seen success. They will not have the experience or the courage to tell you when there is a major flaw with your hiring process, or more importantly, how to fix it. They simply live in a transactional world where it is all about “closing the deal” and have tunnel vision in trying to accomplish that goal.

My Staffing Partner is Actually a Partner

What if you encountered an agency who could, from day one, have a credible conversation because they have the experience and expertise to actually consult with you? Instead of telling you what you want to hear, they can have the conversation you’d typically be having with your vendor after having worked on your position for 4 weeks on the first day. That saves you time, which saves you money. What if you were working with a partner who actually “gets it”? Instead of blasting you with ten resumes a week, they took the time identify what it is you are really looking for and sent you only the qualified candidates. This saves you time, which saves you money.

What if you you reached out to your partner because you have been struggling to fill a need, and instead of just taking a job order, they could tell you how to fill the role? They can do this because they have done it before and can share with you the best practices that they have seen work for other organizations. What if your partner cared more about the long-term relationship and less about the short-term transaction? That means doing the right thing, and not just telling you what you want to hear because they want to close the deal. Wouldn’t it be great if you could rely on your staffing agency as a partner, and know they will work with you build a customized solution to fill your positions?

Conclusion

There are a lot of agencies out there, and choosing the right one can seem a bit daunting. Some staffing agencies are so large that you have to play by their rules. If your need isn’t a certain bill rate, or the assignment isn’t a certain duration, or you don’t have a process that conforms to theirs, they may not even allow you the privilege of working with them. This is the trademark of someone who is worried more about the transaction then the relationship. The bottom line, if you feel that the relationship you have with your staffing agency is a bit transactional and a bit one-sided, I’m here to tell you that there is hope. There are customer-centric agencies out there who pride themselves as being a consultative partner rather than a transactional vendor.

Goodbye Job Boards

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The improvement of the economy is shifting the control back into the hands of talent, which means job boards are no longer the leading source of hire. Watch this video to find out what you can do to prepare for the death of job boards.

Download our Free White Paper – The Shifting Job Market: Preparing for the Death of Job Boards to learn how to create a sourcing strategy for identifying passive talent and why you shouldn’t start recruiting without one.

2015-TSWP-SIG-JobBoard

Be Vulnerable, Be Curious

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Outside-In Companies are working on the value of being Open Book. To be clear, Open Book is the concept of opening your books to your shareholder(s) and employees so that they may use the information to improve or enhance the way the business is run. Not everyone likes or even grasps the financial concepts that make up financial statement, balance sheets or cash flow statements. BUT, if all see profits and losses and understand how their performance and decisions affect the numbers, then they can play a big part in impacting the success or failure of the business. There is strength in numbers, as they say.

Open-Book-FishLast week we celebrated our Open Book Values Holiday with some symbolism. To illustrate the meaning of Open Book, team members adopted a goldfish for the Outside-In office. We call him Vulnerable and he swims centrally in the office in a fishbowl for all to see. Vulnerable’s fishbowl represents the transparency and clarity you should expect from an Open Book company. Share, share, share it all! All of us should be willing to open our office doors, let customers into meetings, or share information about the state of the business freely. This requires the information to share. And it requires a culture that encourages, craves, even demands insights and information into running the business.

Having no information usually equates to risky decision making. More information gives you a real advantage or leg up on the competition. Most don’t bother, we prefer to take action rather then back up our thinking and really get clear on what the information is telling us!

We are far from great at being Open Book. This is an ongoing work in progress. For example, in order to be open book we must do a better job of encouraging critical thinking and information gathering by all. We must be curious. This concept must be led and encouraged by the leadership. We must teach and insist that all learn to gather information to make good decisions. And we must create opportunities for teammates to learn the financial concepts as well! We must appreciate the curious and insights that make ideas happen.

As we provide information on the business, we want it to spur further questions, which creates the need for more information, more reporting, and so on and so on. This is a never ending, self-perpetuating cycle right? We must be structurally ready to handle this need for reporting and information! We must be able to provide reports and data when needed so all can run their small business.

Our journey with Open Book is just beginning. I think we have much to do to maximize its potential on our companies. Do you work in an Open Book company? Jack Stack started all this with the Great Game of Business over 20 years ago. There are few concepts more polarizing and challenging to implement. However, if done well? Few values can create such far-reaching organizational value!