Blogs

Placers Presents: Preparing Questions for the Interview

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At the end of a job interview, the interviewee will be given a chance to ask questions. There are a few reasons the hiring manager will do this and it can be considered part of the interview. In addition to helping the hiring manager, it can also help the candidate determine if this is the right fit for them before proceeding with additional interviews and getting further along in the process.

Make Sure to Do Your Research

There are certain questions you probably have, but you need to see if you can find them on your own before asking the hiring manager. If you ask a question that can easily be found with a quick Google search, the interviewer will assume you haven’t fully prepared for your question. You shouldn’t only research the company, but also the department and position you are interviewing for. You should also do some research about the industry in general.

What Types of Questions to Ask?

You should come prepared with at least two questions to ask. Avoid yes or no questions and questions that are so broad that they can be difficult to answer. Your goal isn’t to stump the interviewer and you want to make a good impression. Keep questions focused and open-ended.

Questions about day-to-day responsibilities, important qualities for the role and the company culture are all good starting points. These types of questions will help you determine if you think the role is a good fit for you and if you would enjoy working at this company. Questions about expectations of the role and where the company is headed can also help you determine if you have a future at the company, should you get the position and choose to accept it. You can also ask about opportunities and different career paths for someone in the role. This will also show you if you have a future at this company and if it’s the right fit.

The interview process is not the time to ask about salary or benefits. These questions should wait until you are in negotiations with the job offer, or after the first round of interviews.

Don’t just ask questions you think the interviewer wants to hear. Ask questions that you also want the answers to, so you can make an informed decision about the job.

Remember that some of your questions may have been answered during the interview process. This is why it is good to come prepared with multiple questions so you aren’t stuck at the end with questions that have already been answered. One of the questions you can ask to end the interview is about the next steps, so you will be prepared for what is needed and can leave the interview on a strong note.

Reasons Why Questions Are Important

Questions show that you are interested in the job. If you are taking the time to develop questions then you have spent time thinking about the interview and preparing for it. Questions show that you have researched the company, as long as they are good questions that are not easy to find on the website. Great questions can also help show the interviewer how intelligent you are. Hiring managers want people who can think independently, and if you ask some great questions, it can show your drive to the person conducting the interview.

Placers Presents: Preparing Questions for the Interview

  by    0   0

At the end of a job interview, the interviewee will be given a chance to ask questions. There are a few reasons the hiring manager will do this and it can be considered part of the interview. In addition to helping the hiring manager, it can also help the candidate determine if this is the right fit for them before proceeding with additional interviews and getting further along in the process.

Make Sure to Do Your Research

There are certain questions you probably have, but you need to see if you can find them on your own before asking the hiring manager. If you ask a question that can easily be found with a quick Google search, the interviewer will assume you haven’t fully prepared for your question. You shouldn’t only research the company, but also the department and position you are interviewing for. You should also do some research about the industry in general.

What Types of Questions to Ask?

You should come prepared with at least two questions to ask. Avoid yes or no questions and questions that are so broad that they can be difficult to answer. Your goal isn’t to stump the interviewer and you want to make a good impression. Keep questions focused and open-ended.

Questions about day-to-day responsibilities, important qualities for the role and the company culture are all good starting points. These types of questions will help you determine if you think the role is a good fit for you and if you would enjoy working at this company. Questions about expectations of the role and where the company is headed can also help you determine if you have a future at the company, should you get the position and choose to accept it. You can also ask about opportunities and different career paths for someone in the role. This will also show you if you have a future at this company and if it’s the right fit.

The interview process is not the time to ask about salary or benefits. These questions should wait until you are in negotiations with the job offer, or after the first round of interviews.

Don’t just ask questions you think the interviewer wants to hear. Ask questions that you also want the answers to, so you can make an informed decision about the job.

Remember that some of your questions may have been answered during the interview process. This is why it is good to come prepared with multiple questions so you aren’t stuck at the end with questions that have already been answered. One of the questions you can ask to end the interview is about the next steps, so you will be prepared for what is needed and can leave the interview on a strong note.

Reasons Why Questions Are Important

Questions show that you are interested in the job. If you are taking the time to develop questions then you have spent time thinking about the interview and preparing for it. Questions show that you have researched the company, as long as they are good questions that are not easy to find on the website. Great questions can also help show the interviewer how intelligent you are. Hiring managers want people who can think independently, and if you ask some great questions, it can show your drive to the person conducting the interview.

Placers Presents: “New Job Orientation” Can I just start my new job already!?

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In order to ensure that our candidates will be completely successful in their new position with Placers, we, in part with our clients, require a New Hire Orientation for all of those brand new employees. The New Hire Orientation has slowly evolved to adapt to the changes experienced not only by our clients but the constant changes in the workforce demand today.  Each program is individualized and personalized with client-specific information within. However, each session also includes vital Placers information to make sure everything they need to know is discussed in detail. We aim to establish a strong and lasting relationship between the candidate, the client, and Placers.

The reason this initial meeting is so important is that it gives all new candidates an opportunity for Placers to coach and educate them on who we are, what we do, and why we do it; all while they simultaneously become acclimated to the client’s established culture and expectations. When things are discussed, outlined, and established ahead of time, a lot less confusion and questions arise after the first day; there are already enough jitters that come along with a first day, so why create more?  This can encourage candidates to ask any and all questions they may have, and to communicate any concerns in a comfortable setting before they head to the site on their first day.

New Hire Orientation is something that allows an extra dose of instruction to the workforce while sharing the client-specific information that is so important to know before stepping foot on the site. We know and understand that a first day anywhere that is new and unfamiliar can sometimes be overwhelming and cause some anxiety. But, we at Placers are here to alleviate that anxiety by sharing all information openly and freely; the more you know, the more empowered you can become, which is extremely important when it comes to your career goals!

In order to ensure some success at New Hire Orientation, follow the tips below to make sure you are getting the most out of the experience:

    • Come Prepared: Bring a notebook, pen, and necessary documents requested. This alleviates “downtime” that otherwise may make Orientation feel slow or dull.
    • Dress the Part: First impressions last. Dress in business casual attire or the required uniform in order to show your organization, preparedness, & professionalism
    • Pay Attention: Put down the phone, grab your caffeinated beverage, and take some detailed notes. The more you retain and understand during the presentation, the less confusing things will be after you leave.
    • Ask Questions: If there is anything at all that seems confusing, ask. If you are unsure of anything regarding your position, ask. This is the time to clear things up before your first day at the site. Be honest because we are here to help!
    • Keep the Folder Handy: The orange folder given to each person has vital information and answers to FAQs. Look in the folder for answers before you send that email.

Overall and in conclusion, we aim to prepare our new employees to ensure independence, confidence, and success while they are onsite with our clients. By making sure that we are finding the best fit for each person individually, we are setting them up to succeed in multiple ways on a path that aligns with their career goals. We ensure a happy client by sending along top-notch and prepared talent that is educated on their culture and their company values. It’s simply a win-win.

Placers Presents: “New Job Orientation” Can I just start my new job already!?

  by    0   0

In order to ensure that our candidates will be completely successful in their new position with Placers, we, in part with our clients, require a New Hire Orientation for all of those brand new employees. The New Hire Orientation has slowly evolved to adapt to the changes experienced not only by our clients but the constant changes in the workforce demand today.  Each program is individualized and personalized with client-specific information within. However, each session also includes vital Placers information to make sure everything they need to know is discussed in detail. We aim to establish a strong and lasting relationship between the candidate, the client, and Placers.

The reason this initial meeting is so important is that it gives all new candidates an opportunity for Placers to coach and educate them on who we are, what we do, and why we do it; all while they simultaneously become acclimated to the client’s established culture and expectations. When things are discussed, outlined, and established ahead of time, a lot less confusion and questions arise after the first day; there are already enough jitters that come along with a first day, so why create more?  This can encourage candidates to ask any and all questions they may have, and to communicate any concerns in a comfortable setting before they head to the site on their first day.

New Hire Orientation is something that allows an extra dose of instruction to the workforce while sharing the client-specific information that is so important to know before stepping foot on the site. We know and understand that a first day anywhere that is new and unfamiliar can sometimes be overwhelming and cause some anxiety. But, we at Placers are here to alleviate that anxiety by sharing all information openly and freely; the more you know, the more empowered you can become, which is extremely important when it comes to your career goals!

In order to ensure some success at New Hire Orientation, follow the tips below to make sure you are getting the most out of the experience:

    • Come Prepared: Bring a notebook, pen, and necessary documents requested. This alleviates “downtime” that otherwise may make Orientation feel slow or dull.
    • Dress the Part: First impressions last. Dress in business casual attire or the required uniform in order to show your organization, preparedness, & professionalism
    • Pay Attention: Put down the phone, grab your caffeinated beverage, and take some detailed notes. The more you retain and understand during the presentation, the less confusing things will be after you leave.
    • Ask Questions: If there is anything at all that seems confusing, ask. If you are unsure of anything regarding your position, ask. This is the time to clear things up before your first day at the site. Be honest because we are here to help!
    • Keep the Folder Handy: The orange folder given to each person has vital information and answers to FAQs. Look in the folder for answers before you send that email.

Overall and in conclusion, we aim to prepare our new employees to ensure independence, confidence, and success while they are onsite with our clients. By making sure that we are finding the best fit for each person individually, we are setting them up to succeed in multiple ways on a path that aligns with their career goals. We ensure a happy client by sending along top-notch and prepared talent that is educated on their culture and their company values. It’s simply a win-win.

Placers Presents: How to Use Volunteer Experience to Land a Job

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Could your resume use a little padding? Are you struggling to come up with accomplishments to mention in your interview? If you haven’t already talked up your volunteer experience, it’s time to start.

Your efforts as a volunteer are worthy of praise, and they just might lead to your dream job — a study from the Corporation for National and Community Service indicates that jobless individuals who volunteer are 27 percent more likely to find work.

Perhaps you’re proud of your hard work as a volunteer, but not sure how, exactly, it will fit into your resume. Don’t act on the impulse to tone down unpaid work. Instead, use these suggestions to make the most of your volunteer experience:

Substitute Volunteer Positions For Relevant Work History

An age-old conundrum for job seekers: listings tend to mandate several years of experience. Unfortunately, requisite experience can be difficult to come by when it’s an entry-level requirement for so many jobs.

The good news? In some cases, volunteerism can be a work-around. After all, the barrier for entry is far lower for volunteer positions. Volunteer coordinators are typically thrilled to take on and train new candidates — even those who lack critical skills or are completely new to the field. Grateful for the help, coordinators may also provide glowing references for volunteers seeking paid work.

If you lack work experience in your field of choice, don’t be afraid to play up relevant volunteer efforts. Employers love to see job candidates with exposure to the field, even on a part-time basis or for no compensation. Volunteerism also demonstrates key qualities such as compassion and dedication.

When listing volunteer positions in your resume or on LinkedIn, describe the full scope of each position. Which responsibilities were you given, and how did you handle them? How will the lessons learned in your volunteer position help you in future jobs? For example, if you intend to go into marketing, you can highlight your efforts as social media coordinator for a favorite charity. Perhaps you helped organize and run a successful fundraiser; this could improve your prospects as you seek a position in accounting, finance, or management. In general, you should highlight any volunteer accomplishments that required you to step up and demonstrate employable skills.

Listing As a Job Versus As Related Experience

Depending on your resume, volunteer positions could look like typical job entries or could be included in a special section. Resume layout will largely be determined by which paid positions you’ve held.

If you’re just starting out in your career and have only held part-time jobs in unrelated fields, relevant volunteer experience may be more valuable to employers than your prior paid positions. What looks better: a volunteer position involving leadership and technical skills? Or a paid position at a fast food restaurant?

When the pickings are slim, you’re better off including your volunteer position in the general ‘work experience’ field. If, however, you’ve had one or more full-time, paid positions in your field (or your volunteer job is not directly related to your industry), you can include volunteering in a separate area marked ‘related experience.’

As a volunteer, you’ve contributed dozens or even hundreds of hours to your community. You deserve recognition for your efforts. Don’t be afraid to highlight volunteer experience to gain an edge over other job candidates.

Placers Presents: How to Use Volunteer Experience to Land a Job

  by    0   0

Could your resume use a little padding? Are you struggling to come up with accomplishments to mention in your interview? If you haven’t already talked up your volunteer experience, it’s time to start.

Your efforts as a volunteer are worthy of praise, and they just might lead to your dream job — a study from the Corporation for National and Community Service indicates that jobless individuals who volunteer are 27 percent more likely to find work.

Perhaps you’re proud of your hard work as a volunteer, but not sure how, exactly, it will fit into your resume. Don’t act on the impulse to tone down unpaid work. Instead, use these suggestions to make the most of your volunteer experience:

Substitute Volunteer Positions For Relevant Work History

An age-old conundrum for job seekers: listings tend to mandate several years of experience. Unfortunately, requisite experience can be difficult to come by when it’s an entry-level requirement for so many jobs.

The good news? In some cases, volunteerism can be a work-around. After all, the barrier for entry is far lower for volunteer positions. Volunteer coordinators are typically thrilled to take on and train new candidates — even those who lack critical skills or are completely new to the field. Grateful for the help, coordinators may also provide glowing references for volunteers seeking paid work.

If you lack work experience in your field of choice, don’t be afraid to play up relevant volunteer efforts. Employers love to see job candidates with exposure to the field, even on a part-time basis or for no compensation. Volunteerism also demonstrates key qualities such as compassion and dedication.

When listing volunteer positions in your resume or on LinkedIn, describe the full scope of each position. Which responsibilities were you given, and how did you handle them? How will the lessons learned in your volunteer position help you in future jobs? For example, if you intend to go into marketing, you can highlight your efforts as social media coordinator for a favorite charity. Perhaps you helped organize and run a successful fundraiser; this could improve your prospects as you seek a position in accounting, finance, or management. In general, you should highlight any volunteer accomplishments that required you to step up and demonstrate employable skills.

Listing As a Job Versus As Related Experience

Depending on your resume, volunteer positions could look like typical job entries or could be included in a special section. Resume layout will largely be determined by which paid positions you’ve held.

If you’re just starting out in your career and have only held part-time jobs in unrelated fields, relevant volunteer experience may be more valuable to employers than your prior paid positions. What looks better: a volunteer position involving leadership and technical skills? Or a paid position at a fast food restaurant?

When the pickings are slim, you’re better off including your volunteer position in the general ‘work experience’ field. If, however, you’ve had one or more full-time, paid positions in your field (or your volunteer job is not directly related to your industry), you can include volunteering in a separate area marked ‘related experience.’

As a volunteer, you’ve contributed dozens or even hundreds of hours to your community. You deserve recognition for your efforts. Don’t be afraid to highlight volunteer experience to gain an edge over other job candidates.