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What Millennials Can Bring to Your Talent Pipeline

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Talent acquisition comes with a unique set of traits to look for in potential employees. Some of the more obvious ones are dependability, loyalty, and a strong work ethic. With millennials, you might have to look even further at what they can offer. This group of candidates is defined as 18-34 years old, and now make up 75.4 million people. They outnumber the “Baby Boomers” slightly, so they are the largest group in the workforce today.

This is a wide range of possible employees. Many are just entering the workforce right out of high school, while others have completed college, their masters, or have been employed for quite some time. All of them have certain traits that will be beneficial to your talent pool as recruiters who are looking at this prime age of workers in many different fields of employment. So what can this group of candidates bring to your talent pipeline?

Three millennials walking past a dark stairway in Seattle

Ambition: Millennials are a “can do” generation. They like to get things done, contrary to reports of them being lazy or aloof. The Council of Economic Advisers reports that around 61 percent of millennials have attended college, as compared to only 46 percent of Baby Boomers. Their ambitions are high, some due to the fact that they have excessive college debt to pay down. Either way this helps to have an attitude that will allow them to achieve great things in their careers, since they desire success. Plus they know what’s it’s like to work through a down economy, during the years 2007-2009, when the oldest of the generation was just 27-years-old.

Tech expertise: “Digital natives” as this generation could be called, grew up during the beginning of the internet boom. This makes millennial candidates very tech savvy, so working in a high tech workplace and adapting quickly isn’t an issue. It can also be an asset from a work culture standpoint, as candidates can really bring different generations of employees together with technology. Many of them love being team players which fosters a solid work environment, and generally function well in a team setting.

However, one of the biggest challenges with mellennial talent is actually attracting and retaining candidates. Millennials desire different perks and environments than past generation, and companies are tailoring their workforce strategy, respectively. Check out some of our previous blogs to learn what companies are doing to attract and retain highly sought IT talent.

 

 

What Millennials Can Bring to Your Talent Pipeline

  by    0   0

Talent acquisition comes with a unique set of traits to look for in potential employees. Some of the more obvious ones are dependability, loyalty, and a strong work ethic. With millennials, you might have to look even further at what they can offer. This group of candidates is defined as 18-34 years old, and now make up 75.4 million people. They outnumber the “Baby Boomers” slightly, so they are the largest group in the workforce today.

This is a wide range of possible employees. Many are just entering the workforce right out of high school, while others have completed college, their masters, or have been employed for quite some time. All of them have certain traits that will be beneficial to your talent pool as recruiters who are looking at this prime age of workers in many different fields of employment. So what can this group of candidates bring to your talent pipeline?

Three millennials walking past a dark stairway in Seattle

Ambition: Millennials are a “can do” generation. They like to get things done, contrary to reports of them being lazy or aloof. The Council of Economic Advisers reports that around 61 percent of millennials have attended college, as compared to only 46 percent of Baby Boomers. Their ambitions are high, some due to the fact that they have excessive college debt to pay down. Either way this helps to have an attitude that will allow them to achieve great things in their careers, since they desire success. Plus they know what’s it’s like to work through a down economy, during the years 2007-2009, when the oldest of the generation was just 27-years-old.

Tech expertise: “Digital natives” as this generation could be called, grew up during the beginning of the internet boom. This makes millennial candidates very tech savvy, so working in a high tech workplace and adapting quickly isn’t an issue. It can also be an asset from a work culture standpoint, as candidates can really bring different generations of employees together with technology. Many of them love being team players which fosters a solid work environment, and generally function well in a team setting.

However, one of the biggest challenges with mellennial talent is actually attracting and retaining candidates. Millennials desire different perks and environments than past generation, and companies are tailoring their workforce strategy, respectively. Check out some of our previous blogs to learn what companies are doing to attract and retain highly sought IT talent.

 

 

What Millennials Can Bring to Your Talent Pipeline

  by    0   0

Talent acquisition comes with a unique set of traits to look for in potential employees. Some of the more obvious ones are dependability, loyalty, and a strong work ethic. With millennials, you might have to look even further at what they can offer. This group of candidates is defined as 18-34 years old, and now make up 75.4 million people. They outnumber the “Baby Boomers” slightly, so they are the largest group in the workforce today.

This is a wide range of possible employees. Many are just entering the workforce right out of high school, while others have completed college, their masters, or have been employed for quite some time. All of them have certain traits that will be beneficial to your talent pool as recruiters who are looking at this prime age of workers in many different fields of employment. So what can this group of candidates bring to your talent pipeline?

Three millennials walking past a dark stairway in Seattle

Ambition: Millennials are a “can do” generation. They like to get things done, contrary to reports of them being lazy or aloof. The Council of Economic Advisers reports that around 61 percent of millennials have attended college, as compared to only 46 percent of Baby Boomers. Their ambitions are high, some due to the fact that they have excessive college debt to pay down. Either way this helps to have an attitude that will allow them to achieve great things in their careers, since they desire success. Plus they know what’s it’s like to work through a down economy, during the years 2007-2009, when the oldest of the generation was just 27-years-old.

Tech expertise: “Digital natives” as this generation could be called, grew up during the beginning of the internet boom. This makes millennial candidates very tech savvy, so working in a high tech workplace and adapting quickly isn’t an issue. It can also be an asset from a work culture standpoint, as candidates can really bring different generations of employees together with technology. Many of them love being team players which fosters a solid work environment, and generally function well in a team setting.

However, one of the biggest challenges with mellennial talent is actually attracting and retaining candidates. Millennials desire different perks and environments than past generation, and companies are tailoring their workforce strategy, respectively. Check out some of our previous blogs to learn what companies are doing to attract and retain highly sought IT talent.

 

 

5 Trends that Could Disrupt Workforce Planning in 2017

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Talent Acquisition and HR teams are faced with numerous challenges. Planning agility and workforce insight are more important than ever to business performance. With planning, so many moving pieces and unanticipated changes must still be addressed as a business grows. Toward that end, here are five significant changes that will affect hiring, HR strategy, and workforce development into the next decade.

1. New interest in boomerang candidates

The trend of employees returning to former employers is growing. As recruiters tap into this resource, they’re discovering the many benefits of rehiring former employees. For example, boomerangs are familiar with the company culture and infrastructure, reducing both the time to hire and training period. Expect to see more companies hosting alumni events to re-establish rapport with former employees, and build a pipeline of potential rehires.

2. Rearrangement of offices to attract top talent

Look for office space to shrink as workers strive to find an ideal work-life equilibrium. Forecasts predict the average office space per employee will drop to 150 square feet by 2020. With many employees working remotely, employers must leverage technology to shrink logistical costs. Despite this trend, employers must spend more to offer convenience-sensitive employees a more hassle-free workplace.

3. Companies to automate jobs, upgrade offices – at employees’ expense

Automation will be a major force in 2017. With the rising cost of healthcare, desire to deflate expenses, and the need for modern offices- employers must enforce computerization.Today, every sector is under pressure to automate. However, employees should not panic, as automation can not only take away jobs, but also create them.

4. Expanded freelance market and growth of part-time jobs

Millennials have been striving for more control over their work lives. Employees need more flexibility and they’re levering technology in order to do so, as 2016 saw Millennials turning away from full-time work, opting instead to work part-time or independently. The 21st-century graduate will look to be his own boss – next year, more than ever, and is set to play host to this shift. To meet this trend, companies must accommodate the needs of this arriving generation of professionals.

5. Companies will offer more benefits and perks

Salary increases are projected to rise by 2.9%. If you’re planning on keeping your current job, chances are your raise will be insignificant. Job seekers are pursuing external opportunities to boost their earning power. In light of the talent shortage, employers are in need of quality candidates. Candidates will leverage this in negotiating for benefits and will see more offers with increased benefits as employers seek to remain competitive.

5 Trends that Could Disrupt Workforce Planning in 2017

  by    0   0

Talent Acquisition and HR teams are faced with numerous challenges. Planning agility and workforce insight are more important than ever to business performance. With planning, so many moving pieces and unanticipated changes must still be addressed as a business grows. Toward that end, here are five significant changes that will affect hiring, HR strategy, and workforce development into the next decade.

1. New interest in boomerang candidates

The trend of employees returning to former employers is growing. As recruiters tap into this resource, they’re discovering the many benefits of rehiring former employees. For example, boomerangs are familiar with the company culture and infrastructure, reducing both the time to hire and training period. Expect to see more companies hosting alumni events to re-establish rapport with former employees, and build a pipeline of potential rehires.

2. Rearrangement of offices to attract top talent

Look for office space to shrink as workers strive to find an ideal work-life equilibrium. Forecasts predict the average office space per employee will drop to 150 square feet by 2020. With many employees working remotely, employers must leverage technology to shrink logistical costs. Despite this trend, employers must spend more to offer convenience-sensitive employees a more hassle-free workplace.

3. Companies to automate jobs, upgrade offices – at employees’ expense

Automation will be a major force in 2017. With the rising cost of healthcare, desire to deflate expenses, and the need for modern offices- employers must enforce computerization.Today, every sector is under pressure to automate. However, employees should not panic, as automation can not only take away jobs, but also create them.

4. Expanded freelance market and growth of part-time jobs

Millennials have been striving for more control over their work lives. Employees need more flexibility and they’re levering technology in order to do so, as 2016 saw Millennials turning away from full-time work, opting instead to work part-time or independently. The 21st-century graduate will look to be his own boss – next year, more than ever, and is set to play host to this shift. To meet this trend, companies must accommodate the needs of this arriving generation of professionals.

5. Companies will offer more benefits and perks

Salary increases are projected to rise by 2.9%. If you’re planning on keeping your current job, chances are your raise will be insignificant. Job seekers are pursuing external opportunities to boost their earning power. In light of the talent shortage, employers are in need of quality candidates. Candidates will leverage this in negotiating for benefits and will see more offers with increased benefits as employers seek to remain competitive.

5 Trends that Could Disrupt Workforce Planning in 2017

  by    0   0

Talent Acquisition and HR teams are faced with numerous challenges. Planning agility and workforce insight are more important than ever to business performance. With planning, so many moving pieces and unanticipated changes must still be addressed as a business grows. Toward that end, here are five significant changes that will affect hiring, HR strategy, and workforce development into the next decade.

1. New interest in boomerang candidates

The trend of employees returning to former employers is growing. As recruiters tap into this resource, they’re discovering the many benefits of rehiring former employees. For example, boomerangs are familiar with the company culture and infrastructure, reducing both the time to hire and training period. Expect to see more companies hosting alumni events to re-establish rapport with former employees, and build a pipeline of potential rehires.

2. Rearrangement of offices to attract top talent

Look for office space to shrink as workers strive to find an ideal work-life equilibrium. Forecasts predict the average office space per employee will drop to 150 square feet by 2020. With many employees working remotely, employers must leverage technology to shrink logistical costs. Despite this trend, employers must spend more to offer convenience-sensitive employees a more hassle-free workplace.

3. Companies to automate jobs, upgrade offices – at employees’ expense

Automation will be a major force in 2017. With the rising cost of healthcare, desire to deflate expenses, and the need for modern offices- employers must enforce computerization.Today, every sector is under pressure to automate. However, employees should not panic, as automation can not only take away jobs, but also create them.

4. Expanded freelance market and growth of part-time jobs

Millennials have been striving for more control over their work lives. Employees need more flexibility and they’re levering technology in order to do so, as 2016 saw Millennials turning away from full-time work, opting instead to work part-time or independently. The 21st-century graduate will look to be his own boss – next year, more than ever, and is set to play host to this shift. To meet this trend, companies must accommodate the needs of this arriving generation of professionals.

5. Companies will offer more benefits and perks

Salary increases are projected to rise by 2.9%. If you’re planning on keeping your current job, chances are your raise will be insignificant. Job seekers are pursuing external opportunities to boost their earning power. In light of the talent shortage, employers are in need of quality candidates. Candidates will leverage this in negotiating for benefits and will see more offers with increased benefits as employers seek to remain competitive.